DDoS and Malware Attacks between GCHQ Anonymous and LulzSec Hacktivists - BestCyberNews: Online News Presenter in the present world

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DDoS and Malware Attacks between GCHQ Anonymous and LulzSec Hacktivists

GCHQ is fighting Anonymous and LulzSec hacktivists with DDoS attacks and malware. According to Edward Snowden new leak British intelligence has its own hacker subdivision that uses questionable practices for hunting down enemies of the state.


Edwards Document leaked by NBC News, the British secret service is brandishing a cyber-sword in the guise of the Joint Threat Research Intelligence Group (JTRIG), an intelligence unit not constrained by domestic or international laws.

The documents also show that JTRIG infiltrated chat rooms known as IRCs and identified individual hackers who had taken confidential information from websites.

 In one case JTRIG helped send a hacktivist to prison for stealing data from PayPal, and in another it helped identify hacktivists who attacked government websites.

A presentation prepared for a 2012 NSA conference called SIGDEV, obviously from the collection of documents from the former NSA contractor, Edward Snowden, contains information about the Rolling Thunder operation against Anonymous hacktivists. 

The JTRIG unit is staging distributed denial of service (DDoS) cyber-attacks, implanting malware to disclose identities of hackers in order to prevent their communications.

The same technique hackers use to take down bank, retail and government websites  making the British government the first Western government known to have conducted such an attack.

The presentation was made at a conference of America’s National Security Agency is particularly interesting. It means that the NSA was informed about such governmental activities in the UK.

A DDoS attack is a criminal offence in most countries, the US and UK included. For example, in the UK a person found guilty of a cyber attack would be charged in accordance with the Computer Misuse Act, while in the US such illegal activities are prosecuted with the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA).

The British government with overkill, noting that many of the individuals targeted were teenagers, and that the agency’s assault on communications among hacktivists means the agency infringed the free speech of people never charged with any crime.




Author Venkatesh Yalagandula Follow us Google + and Facebook and Twitter

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