Did you know Wifi can ‘Sneeze’ Malware? - BestCyberNews: Online News Presenter in the present world

BestCyberNews: Online News Presenter in the present world

Start knowing

test banner

Breaking

Did you know Wifi can ‘Sneeze’ Malware?

The University of Liverpool security researchers group found that WiFi access points are highly efficient at passing around virus infections.

The team designed and simulated an attack by a virus, called Chameleon, and found that not only could it spread quickly between homes and businesses, but it was able to avoid detection and identify the points at which WiFi access is least protected by encryption and passwords.

Chameleon is a firmware-replacement attack that presents false outward-facing credentials from infected machines. It can then steal data from users connecting to the access point.

Researchers simulated an attack on Belfast and London in a laboratory setting, and found that Chameleon behaved like an airborne virus, travelling across the WiFi network via Access Points that connect households and businesses to WiFi networks.

The University of Liverpool modelling exercise also showed that Chameleon could identify the least-protected access points visible from an infected site, while avoiding detection. 

Chameleon was able to avoid detection as current virus detection systems look for viruses that are present on the internet or computers, but Chameleon is only ever present in the WiFi network.  

Whilst many APs are sufficiently encrypted and password protected, the virus simply moved on to find those which weren’t strongly protected including open access WiFi points common in locations such as coffee shops and airports.

Professor Marshall said, “WiFi connections are increasingly a target for computer hackers because of well documented security vulnerabilities, which make it difficult to detect and defend against a virus.

“It was assumed, however, that it wasn't possible to develop a virus that could attack WiFi networks but we demonstrated that this is possible and that it can spread quickly. We are now able to use the data generated from this study to develop a new technique to identify when an attack is likely.”




Author Venkatesh Yalagandula Follow us Google + and Facebook and Twitter

No comments:

Post a Comment